What books shaped you? Three for my reading autobiography #WSRA19

At the Wisconsin State Reading Association Convention, Donalyn Miller invited us to write a reading autobiography. This is a list of books that shaped us as readers and as people. My group thought that this activity would be an excellent way to end the school year with students or to re-engage a group of “dormant readers”. Below is my short list.

Elementary School: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume – I was a reluctant reader until my 3rd-grade teacher read it aloud to our class. I’m told that I reread this book several times before I found my next book. I guess I had some catching up to do.

Junior High: It by Stephen King – I’m surprised my junior high teachers let me read this novel and other King books. The content was not middle level appropriate…if I remember correctly, my friend and I found these books at the public library in town. I particularly remember It because half of the story was told from the kids’ point of view. Our town wasn’t nearly as dangerous as Derry but we had just as much free reign, something not often seen in today’s hyper-vigilant world.

High School: Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes – My current preference of science fiction was influenced by this book we read in high school English. The idea that science and technology might always have a cost in addition to the opportunities realized has stayed with me.

What books would be in your reading autobiography? How did these books shape you? Consider writing your own post or share in the comments here.

An Open Letter to Judy Blume

*This letter was written by one of my fourth grade classrooms as a shared writing activity. As a school, we have focused on modeling writing for kids regularly. In this case, the class is responding to a book by Judy Blume. I told them I would share their writing with Judy Blume via Twitter. If you could, please comment on this post as the students would love feedback, even if your name is not Judy Blume!

Dear Judy Blume,

​We are fourth graders from Mrs. Sonnenberg’s class at Howe Elementary School in Wisconsin Rapids. Our class really liked your book Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. Earlier this year we also read Freckle Juice and The One in the Middle is the Green Kangaroo. Your books are funny and entertaining.

​In Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing we thought Fudge was very hilarious. Especially when he ate flowers, played with socks, ate Dribble, and didn’t eat his food. He seemed like a normal two year old boy at times though. Like when he was banging on pots and pans. We did enjoy the ‘Eat it or wear it!’ part very much.

​Peter tried to act all mature. There were many times Peter wished Fudge was never born. Boy, we had a lot of connections with that. One time Peter was really annoyed when Fudge was lost in the movies.

​The book was totally awesome. We have a few questions for you.

Why did you decide to have Fudge eat Dribble?
How did you come up with all those good ideas?
Do you think you could make a 6th Fudge book?
​Can you write back to us?
Why did you make these books into a series?
When did you want to become a published author?
How many books have you published?

We thought your book was the best. We wish you could come over to visit us.

​​​​​Sincerely,

​​​​​Mrs. Sonnenberg’s Class