Recommended iPad Apps for Administrators

My team of elementary principals has agreed to purchase iPads. If we expect teachers to use technology with the purpose of improving pedagogy and learning, we need to model it. The fact that I discovered through Twitter that there is an iPad 4 only emphasizes our need to be connected learners. Without this knowledge, iPad 3s would be getting shipped to us as I write.

One of the first steps we are taking is deciding what apps to have preloaded on our devices. Here are a few that I am recommending to my technology director, Phil Bickelhaupt (@WRtechdirector). Many of these may be familiar to you, and I suppose there is a reason for that.

Free

  • Evernote – Excellent way to record and document gatherings (not “meetings”). Just this week, I held an impromptu staff gathering about some decisions made in our leadership team. Because of the short notice, not everyone could make it. I used Evernote to write down notes and record our conversation. Afterwards, I emailed the combined content to the rest of the staff. I am aware of at least two teachers who did listen to the audio while reviewing the notes.
  • Skitch – This app allows me to annotate over any photo or screenshot. I can then email that photo to a colleague, save it on my Camera Roll, export it to Evernote (this app is part of the Evernote Trunk), or create a public link as a final product. In the past, I have mostly used Skitch to email annotated photos of students to staff, but it seems like there is much potential with this tool.
  • Chrome – I had this app a while ago and didn’t like it. As people are want to say, Google doesn’t play with Apple. Since then, Chrome must have been improved. I can now check my school email account, modify my Google Site, work on Docs and use it as the browser that it is.
  • Dropbox – While Google Drive is nice for storing many kinds of documents, Dropbox does the rest. If I have photos or video I took in a classroom on my iPad, I can use this storage application to directly upload this content to my account. Once I have downloaded Dropbox to my computer and my phone, I can view these items wherever and whenever I want. Other perks include sharing folders with colleagues as well the iWorks Suite (Pages, Numbers, Keynote – all essential apps as well) now allowing uploading of files to Dropbox.
  • Flipboard – There is so much information out there. It is hard to wade through everything online without some type of reader app that delivers your favorite educational information to you. Flipboard subscribes to blogs and online news providers and puts the content into a magazine-style format. Content that you like can easily be shared via Twitter and email, or saved to read later. Zite is a similar reader app that is popular with educators.

Paid

  • GoodReader – This tool has been described as the Swiss Army Knife of apps and for good reason. As a principal, I have many files and documents I need to read, but I don’t always have time to do it. With GoodReader, I can save and organize this information into folders. I can also retrieve files from Dropbox or Google Drive by linking these accounts to the app. One of the best parts of GoodReader is being able to annotate and highlight a PDF, then save it and email it to a colleague later.
  • Notability – If the interface of GoodReader is a bit too busy, check out this app. It has a much cleaner look and is somewhat easier to organize files. Although I cannot connect with Google Drive, I can upload content from Dropbox. I use both apps for different purposes. While GoodReader is excellent for reading (hence the title), Notability is great for jotting notes with the handwriting tool. I can also import photos into the document as well as record audio. I think there is a lot of potential for using this tool with instructional walkthroughs. So why not use Notability instead of Evernote? Even though the former allows me to handwrite, the latter embeds the audio within my notes when sharing the content online.
  • Instapaper – When you think about it, the majority of our days are spent reading, much of it online. Viewing this much web content can be hard on the eyes. Instapaper is an app that allows me to bookmark text online and read it later in a plain, Kindle-like format.
  • Grafio – This app allows me to create diagrams and flow charts for my ideas and plans. It is very intuitive in that when I attempt to make certain shapes, it autocorrects the circle or square so it is perfect. Dragging a finger from one shape to another creates an instant arrow link. I have used this app to create a visual for my building’s professional development plan and to assign lunch supervisors to specific parts of the building.
  • iMovie – Creating videos using photos, video and audio is a cinch with this app. In my humble opinion, it is better than the Mac version because it is simpler. I can stretch out the audio or photo in the timeline by spreading the file out with two fingers. Uploading the finished movie to YouTube or Vimeo allows me to share the final product through a web link. I have used this app for recognizing student achievement and recording student book talks.

As an elementary principal, these apps are what I use the most. What are your favorites? Please share in the comments.

Getting Started with ePortfolios

In a recent post, I laid out my school’s long-term plan for implementing ePortfolios.

Portfolios in my district have been more of a chore for teachers, instead of a powerful tool for reflection and to show growth over time. Even when I was teaching, it seemed like a hoop we had to jump through. There are a variety of reasons for this: Lack of professional development for staff, no easy way to periodically share student work with parents, and (seemingly) never enough time during the school day. Our hope is that technology and time to collaborate will help change this for the better.

The screenshot below is a draft of my agenda for my staff’s first technology training night. What is not listed in the agenda is the research, rationale and process to support student portfolios; it will be covered prior to using the technology.

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It is important that I allocate enough time during the training for staff to practice using the technology with colleagues. The goal is that they leave our session with not only the what and the how but also the why we use ePortfolios. We will continue learning together during future technology nights this school year.

Have I covered everything? Are my instructions clear enough that all staff will be successful? If you have any suggestions or feedback for us, please share with a comment.

Using iOS Apps to Develop and Sustain ePortfolios

“First, look at your current literacy initiatives and set goals for how to improve them.”
– From Pathways to the Common Core by Lucy Calkins, Mary Ehrenworth and Christopher Lehman

I am fortunate to have inherited an elementary school last year that had a reading-writing initiative already started. This year we are taking the next step and setting new goals connected with the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). To help us in this process, we have started using professional learning communities. One of our collaborative groups that meet once a month are vertical teams focused on writing. A teacher from each grade level (K-5) plus specialists will come together, bringing student writing samples and rubrics aligned with CCSS. They will use this information to assess our learners, analyze data and make instructional decisions. Additionally, staff are using iPads to create two-way communication with parents, by housing student writing in Dropbox as an ePortfolio.

How it will (hopefully) work: Each student will have their own file in Dropbox. This file can be shared with his or her parent(s) and other teachers by using their email addresses. Families and staff can then view the contents of that student’s file, make comments and even add more samples of that student’s writing. As the year progresses, teachers will periodically visit each student’s writing ePortfolio, both individually and with the student. As a team, they will decide what writing pieces best displays their learning as well as the student’s areas for more growth. When the school year is done, next year’s teacher can move their new students’ writing to their Dropbox files from the previous year’s teacher’s files.

It is both exciting and scary when I think about the shift we are making to improve this part of our assessment system. Although portfolios have never been this accessible by parents and multiple staff members, the concept itself is nothing new. Richard Allington devotes a whole section of his book Schools That Work to this tool for measuring student learning. He describes multiple types of portfolios to use for different purposes. The type we are using are called progress portfolios. They show growth over time by housing pre- and post-assessments, periodic student surveys, interviews and reflections on goals, quick writes, several drafts of the same writing project, running records and retells.

At this point you may be thinking, “Get to the apps already.” But without a framework for using these technology tools, we would most likely end up with a fractured, inconsistent system for collecting and assessing student work. One process I like, also promoted by Allington, is by Allan DeFina in his resource Portfolio Assessment: Getting Started. Here are the steps he recommends for implementing portfolios in schools, followed by my school’s actions in parenthesis:

1. Explain and educate (both teachers and parents).

2. Decide how to and when (with mobile technology, collect one piece of writing per student per month).

3. Demonstrate and decide (model using ePortfolios at staff meetings and parent nights; decide as a staff what standard(s) and genres we will focus on).

4. Establish the role of portfolios in grading (student information is being stored in a third party application, so grades will not be assigned).

5. Rethink the classroom environment (in the cloud; accessible from any Internet-enabled device).

6. Organize (block out time during the school day for students to conference with their teacher on their portfolio’s content).

I can remember teaching not that long ago. Portfolio conferences would be coming up and, later than we should have, the students and I would throw together some semblance of a collection of their work. I generally refer to this dance as the “portfolio shuffle”. By conference time, the portfolios looked great, but they were just for show. Very little reflection and subsequent learning occured during the process. I know, I know, I should have been better about taking time during the year to have students reflect on their writing periodically. But I got busy. And I wasn’t working in a professional learning community, which would have helped me stay more on top of this assessment process.

With that, the goal of this initiative, with regular collaboration, is to develop and sustain online student portfolios in order to see growth in student learning over time while it is happening. Today’s parents want to be more involved in their child’s development at school. It is well explained in Why Social Media Matters by Kitty Porterfield and Meg Carnes. Parents now have multiple devices in which they can access this information. The authors also point to research that shows prior education, background and income level of parents are not as prohibitive for families to connect online as one might assume. All the proof you need can be found in the parent waiting area in your school, just before dismissal. This change to ePortfolios is timely with emerging technologies.

The apps pictured below are the tools we believe will help us achieve our goal.

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The Hub
[huhb] a center around which other things revolve or from which they radiate

Dropbox

You may already be familiar with Dropbox, so I’ll save the description. But why Dropbox and not Evernote or Google Drive to house student writing? Several reasons, specific to our building:

1. Dropbox is the easiest application for both teachers and parents to use. The files in Dropbox more resemble what the teachers see in their shared drive through a district server. The leap from their computer files to Dropbox is a shorter one.
2. Dropbox can accept all types of files without altering their original format. Evernote and Google Drive can also do this, but there is some maneuvering involved to be sure they stay the same.
3. All three allow the teacher to share files with parents. Unfortunately Google doesn’t play well with Apple. Evernote is much better, but requires a lot more training to understand what a “tag”, “notebook” or “stack” is.
4. Both Google and Evernote have a “for Dummies” book written for it. Universal truth: If you have one of these books written about your product, it is not ridiculously easy to use. Dropbox is. The initial goal here is to better communicate student learning, not necessarily to learn a new technology.
5. Each student can have a file assigned to them in Dropbox, along with several files within it for the different months, again to show growth over time.

Easy Portfolio

Developed by physical education teacher Jarrod Robinson, this app provides an easy-to-use interface to document student work. This is not limited to photos or documents only. Links to blog posts, audio of a student retell and video of a group presentation can all be recorded and uploaded to Dropbox. There is a companion app by the same company called Easy Assessment. It allows the user to create rubrics and score students on their work. Because we are just starting ePortfolios, we won’t be using that tool at this time.

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Essential Apps
[uh-sen-shuhl] absolutely necessary; indispensable

Camera and Photos

These native apps are used to snap a picture or take a video of anything and save it on the device. Dropbox connects with your camera roll in Photos and can upload this information. That means a teacher can take a picture of every student’s writing and then save it in Dropbox for later reading. No more heavy bags filled with stacks of papers to take home. As well, students can now either take their writing home if completed right away, or post it on a community bulletin board. The teacher no longer has to run a copy of each piece so he or she can grade one and post the other.

Snapseed and Skitch

Whenever a teacher has a few minutes to score some papers, these apps allow the user to adjust the pictures (Snapseed) and write feedback plus a time stamp right on the photo of the student’s work (Skitch). Save it back to the camera roll and upload it again to Dropbox.

Pages

Now that iOS 6 has arrived, Pages allows the user to upload documents to Dropbox. This update sealed the deal for me. Pages is so versatile in creating documents such as reports and newsletters. So how would a teacher use this to document student writing? At the primary level, the teacher could do some shared writing and save it in each student’s file. It can then serve as a strong example of what that type of writing should look like. For older students, they could email a Word document to their teacher, who can then open it in Pages and subsequently upload it to Dropbox.

iMovie

Speaking and listening are also a part of the CCSS. Even though Easy Portfolio has the capacity to take video of student conversations, iMovie has a lot more functionality to develop presentations. Both photos and video can be combined with text and audio to create movies that can be shared not only in Dropbox but also through YouTube and Vimeo. This may be the only app needed to assess students in their presentation skills.

Other Valuable Apps

Dragon

This dictation tool uses speech-to-text technology that allows students to say what they want to write and literally put it into words. Then a student can copy and paste their now written words into a word processing app such as Pages for revision and storage. Especially helpful for younger kids and students with disabilities.

iCardSort

You can put students’ names and notes on separate cards and sort them based on specific academic skills you are working on with them. Guided reading and math groups can easily be organized and monitored. Although a set cannot be uploaded to Dropbox, a teacher could easily take a snapshot of the current group make-up (home + power) and save that photo in a separate file.

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Evernote, Penultimate and Notability

Evernote is widely used by other schools and districts for student ePortfolios. It seems to be utilized more often at the secondary level, although I know many elementary reading teachers use it successfully to take notes when conferring with a student. Penultimate is the handwriting app that works in concert with Evernote. Notability is another excellent tool for recording and documenting important student information. It is an app that talks with Dropbox. I recently wrote a post about all three applications for assessment.

Book Creator and iBooks

Book Creator allows students to do just as it states: Create their own books. Pictures, text and narration can all be incorporated to write original eBooks. It can be saved into iBooks with the sound still a part of the book, and stored in Dropbox as a PDF. Even if your classroom has only one device, a teacher could write a shared story or nonfiction text to show students the writing process.

Keynote and GoodReader

The CCSS asks students to analyze and respond to multiple texts from different sources and genre. Teachers can model this with Keynote and GoodReader. With Keynote, a teacher could create a slideshow displaying multiple examples of original student work on a singular topic. He or she could then think aloud the process of comparing and contrasting the writings and generating common themes and understandings found. This could be a very effective strategy at the primary level. For older students, GoodReader could serve the same purpose. Original documents related to the content areas such as history can be marked up, highlighted and annotated. GoodReader can also connect with Dropbox for uploading purposes.

Skype (or Google+)

With the video conferencing capabilities of these applications, authors, scientists and other professionals can visit classrooms at a fraction of the cost of an in-person visit, many times free. If the chat is displayed on the interactive whiteboard (IWB) using mirroring technology such as Reflection, the discussion could be recorded and saved for later viewing and research.

Calendar and Reminders

I throw these tools in because it is important to schedule assessment during the instructional day. Calendar can be synced with your online schedule, and Reminders serves as a “to-do” list with built-in alerts.

Final, and Initial Thoughts

In Leading School Change, Todd Whitaker wisely states, “I have spoken about leading change. However, I hope your efforts really involve leading improvement.” As the principal, I will continuously point out that we are learning together throughout the process. We have built in time to showcase our successes and celebrate small victories along the way. As well, we are not changing just because we want to present ourselves as 21st century educators. The concept of ePortfolios has the potential to allow us to better connect with our families, to more closely align our instruction and assessments, and to develop highly collaborative teams to improve student learning. The possibilities that this technology provides makes it an exciting time to be an educator.

References

Allington, Richard and Patricia Cunningham. 2002. Schools That Work: Where All Children Read and Write. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Calkins, Lucy, Mary Ehrenworth, and Christopher Lehman. 2012. Pathways to the Common Core. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

DeFina, Allan. 1992. Portfolio Assessment: Getting Started. New York: Scholastic.

Porterfield, Kitty and Meg Carnes. 2012. Why Social Media Matters. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree.

Whitaker, Todd. 2010. Leading School Change. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.

The Power of a PLN

If anyone you know out there questions the usefulness of Twitter, or may not appreciate how powerful it is to have a Professional Learning Network (PLN), please share this post with them.

Since I joined Twitter last October, I have found my learning to grow exponentially. I credit Curt Rees (@WiscPrincipal), Jessica Johnson (@PrincipalJ) and Todd Whitaker (@ToddWhitaker) for getting me started when they spoke at my state’s administrator conference. With each new person I follow, I have another source of fresh ideas to use in my school and with my staff. And with each new follower, my network of support has increased at least ten fold. Literally. If they retweet a post I have written or a question I have to their followers, my group of potential colleagues has increased beyond what I can measure. Exponential, right?

Case in point: This morning I wrote a rough schedule for a course I would like to teach this school year for district staff, titled “The Connected Educator”. Wanting some feedback on my progress, I sent out this tweet and attached screenshot:

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Here is a sampling of the response I received, my replies back not included:

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Is there any other tool or group out there that can provide this kind of quick and reliable learning support? If so, I haven’t found it yet.

Now that I have consulted members of my PLN, I have drastically changed how I am going to facilitate this course. For example, instead of teaching a list of technology tools, I am going to share with participants how and why I use these tools to create a better learning environment for students. In addition, Kathy Cassidy (@kathycassidy) astutely pointed out that the title of my proposed course is also the title of a book written by Sheryl NussbaumBeach (@snbeach). I now have a possible text to reference in my instruction and learning.

For the person that still wonders what all the fuss is about regarding Twitter and PLNs, this example should serve as a notice, that every day they neglect to use these powerful tools for learning is a day they may have failed to grow as much as they could.

Using the Document Camera for Reading Aloud

(Thanks to Tia Henriksen, @henriksent, for better post title suggestion)

I left the classroom in 2007 after seven years as an elementary teacher to become a dean of students and athletic director at a junior high school. At that time, the overhead projector was the tool I used to display anything visual. SmartBoards were just starting to be installed. The only hands-on part about overheads was when a student had to run to the main office to get a replacement after the bulb burned out mid-lesson. In fact, that was one of my students’ classroom jobs. How technology has changed in such a short period of time is amazing.

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With all of these choices, it can be daunting to decide which device best supports the instructional needs in a teacher’s classroom. Focusing on reading aloud, I find the best technology to be the document camera. Used in concert with a voice amplification system, the document camera has taken this essential part of a balanced literacy program to a whole new level. It is a key tool for teachers to model the learning process, an essential step in Regie Routman’s Optimal Learning Model and similar frameworks for instruction.

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While I am still trying to figure out where this technology tool belongs on the SAMR ladder, I have found that the document camera can augment read aloud time in the classroom.

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Reading Aloud Becomes Interactive and Shared at the Same Time
Rather than having different literature and separate times for reading aloud, for shared reading and for interactive reading alouds, a teacher could combine all of these practices into one activity. I often place the picture book or novel under the document camera so students can see the text as I read. Students can ask questions about text features as I read, even coming up to the book or SmartBoard to point out the specific item they wanted more information about. For example, a 2nd grader asked what the little symbols between paragraphs meant while reading aloud Tumtum and Nutmeg by Emily Bearn (to switch scenes during a chapter). These teachable moments can be documented by snapping a picture of the page to review later.

Previously “Unread-aloud-able” Books Can Now Be Read Aloud
I am referring to the books that you would love to share with students, but cannot because they do not work when just reading the text. A perfect example is Wonderstruck by Brian Selznick, a book I read aloud to 4th graders this school year. Prior to document cameras, I would have had to hold up this bulky book and display the pictures when the narrative transitioned from Ben’s story (told through text) to Rose’s story (told through illustrations). My arms hurt just thinking about having to do this. Instead, I was able to lay the book down and take my time as we perused the pictures. What’s even cooler is I can zoom in on certain parts of the illustration or text when we notice something important, which previously only a student reading alone could do.

My Thinking Becomes More Visible

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I have always tried to use a lot of reflective language while reading aloud and identify the spot in the story that caused me to think. Now with a document camera, the potential is there to make the thinking in my head while reading more concrete. For instance, I use Post-it notes while reading aloud books at the primary level to document my thinking. Before reading, I state my purpose for reading a book, whether just for pleasure or to gather information. Sometimes it is the same book read twice, once for each purpose (see: Mentor Texts). Owl Moon by Jane Yolen worked great at 1st grade. After reading it aloud to enjoy the story, I came back a second day to highlight some of the great descriptive language to help me with my own writing. After modeling this with Post-it notes, students raised their hands to share their picks for great examples of descriptive language in Jane Yolen’s book. I acknowledged their input by writing down their suggestions on a Post-it next to mine, for later reflection at the end.

Reading Aloud Becomes Instantly Differentiated
As a colleague of mine was apt to state, you could through a rock out in the hallway and hit someone with attention deficit disorder. While recognizing this as hyperbole, I would agree that many students lack the stamina and practice of listening to the written word spoken aloud. What the document camera does is give that visual in addition to the auditory.

I don’t always use the document camera when reading aloud. In fact, most chapter books I read aloud at grades five and up are from a comfortable chair with zero technology. But when a book begs to be supplemented with a technology tool that enhances the read aloud experience and allows the student to better attend to its message, why not use it?

Not to sound redundant…the document camera is a great technology tool for all areas of instruction. I recommend the following resources for using the document camera in the classroom (you may notice a theme):

58 Ways Teachers Can Use the Document Camera

50 Ways to Use a Document Camera

25 Ways for Students to Use Document Cameras

My Teachers’ Favorite iPad Apps

Teachers in my building could sign up to receive an iPad 2 plus training during second semester. Using Kathy Schrock’s iPad app Evaluation Rubric, teachers culminated the first round of training by recommending a favorite reading or math app they used with students in their classroom.

ABC Magic
Recommended by: Lisa B
Grade Level(s): K-1
Content Area: Language Arts
Cost: Free

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Description
A phonics-based series of apps to reinforce sound and spelling patterns.

Futaba – Classroom Games for Kids
Recommended by: Krista
Grade Level(s): K-2
Content Area: Math or Reading
Cost: $3.99

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Description
This app has been popular with my kids because it is a game that more than one student can play at a time. They work together cooperatively and have fun while practicing math facts or sight words. I have used this during literacy time (it was a task that needed to be completed for the literacy menu). I like that you can customize this app to fit the needs of each student or group of students. I would like to see more game content added. There are a few glitches that might need to be worked out.

Counting Money
Recommended by: Monica
Grade Level(s): K-5+
Content Area: Math – Money
Cost: Free

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Description
I would recommend this title and it’s similar app titled Counting Money + ($1.99). I have used it whole class and it could easily be used with pairs or individuals. It doesn’t have the fancy graphics that some apps have but the sound and real pictures it offers of dollars and coins is great. The settings this app offers allow you to set it for beginners or advanced learners. Within this app are three different types of games: counting only coins, counting only dollars, and counting coins and dollars.

Motion Math: Wings
Recommended by: Janice
Grade Level(s): Ages 4+
Content Area: Math – Multiplication
Cost: Free (with option to purchase more levels)

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Description
This app is a great way to practice math fact skills. There are many levels available for young to older students. Motion Math also has Hungry Fish.

Wake the Rooster by Telling Time: Tiny Chicken
Recommended by: Bri
Grade Level(s): Primary
Content Area: Math – Time
Cost: Free

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Description
It’s a basic app, but offers repeated practice setting times. I like it because it includes all increments and varies in difficulty. I don’t like that it doesn’t show the correct time if you get one wrong.

Spelling Test
Recommended by: Kim
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: Language Arts – Spelling
Cost: Free

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Description
This app allows teachers to input spelling words for the week, along with a voice recording of each word, so students can practice independently. The student simply taps on which list they would like to practice, the words are displayed, and when he or she is ready, the student taps on “take test”. A word from the list is read orally to the student (in the teacher’s voice), and the student types the word on the keypad. If the student needs to hear the word again, there is a button to hear it repeated. Immediate feedback is given to the student following each word. At the end of the test, all words are displayed alongside the correct spelling. There is also the option to have test scores reported by email (I have not used this option, yet). This is a great app to use with students who finish early or students who don’t practice at home.

Baseball
Recommended by: April
Grade Level(s): 3-5
Content Area: Math – Multiplication
Cost: Free

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Description
I recommend this app for intermediate students who finish early. It’s fun for students to play with a partner; it challenges their multiplication skills. The automatic outs allow both teams to have a chance to play often. It would be better if it had an option to specify facts.

Rocket Math
Recommended by: Jean
Grade Level(s): 3
Content Area: Math
Cost: Free

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Description
Great for all levels – independent use. Kids construct own rocket with $300 to buy boosters, color and rocket. Then they choose a skill area to practice – money, time, multiplication, etc. They earn points based on skill and how high their rocket launches.

Math Garden
Recommended by: Jen
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: Math
Cost: Free

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Description
I would recommend this app for students who need to practice their basic math facts. In Math Garden, you get to grow your own corn fields but you need to water them by answering math questions. You can choose the level of difficulty and the type of problems to practice addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.

24. Math Game
Recommended by: Dawn
Grade Level(s): 3+
Content Area: Math
Cost: $1.99

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Description
I would recommend this application for developing basic math facts, order of operations, and flexibility in thinking. We use 24 as a warm up for every math class. Kids LOVE it! It is an excellent math thinking game. Each time a student gets 24 by four multiplication/division/subtraction, new cards are dealt. To provide choice, we write down the first set of cards so that if kids want to stick with those numbers to get 24 a different way, they can. I limit the game to five minutes and keep track of who gets 24.

iEarnedThat
Recommended by: Lori W
Grade Level(s): All
Content Area: Motivation
Cost: $1.99

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Description
This is a useful app. It allows you to determine a separate reward for each student and monitor their progress. The 3D puzzle is an effective way to see their progress toward their goal. It eliminates charts. Can be used for multiple students.

Bluster!
Recommended by: Sue
Grade Level(s): 2-5
Content Area: Language Arts
Cost: Free

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Description
Bluster! is a language arts app for grades 2-5. It may be used individually, as a team, or two students against one another. It works on adjectives, prefixes, suffixes, rhyming words, homophones, root words and synonyms. Students are working on skills presented in class. They are motivated by the iPad format to practice.

Evernote
Recommended by: Molly
Grade Level(s): All
Content Area: Productivity
Cost: Free

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Description
Helps you remember everything across all devices. The app can voice record, capture photos, and make notes. It has a lot of potential for recording student work.

Flipboard
Recommended by: Molly
Grade Level(s): N/A
Content Area: News
Cost: Free

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Description
The app works like a cool magazine. It lets you search the Internet for articles in a specific area, then presents them in a magazine format.

Story Builder
Recommended by: Genesis
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: Reading – Story Elements, Inferencing, Answering “WH-” Questions
Cost: $5.99

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Description
This app won Best Reading App of 2011 through the Huffington Post. It allows children to create stories by forming individual sentences using pictures and question prompts. Students record themselves sentence by sentence and play back an entire story they created. The instructor needs to provide the feedback for this app. There are scaffolding options so students can build stories with less prompting. In addition to story elements, this app can be used for inferences, “WH-” questions, fluency, grammar/sentence structure, sequencing and sound production. The pictures and audio feedback are engaging and promote expressive language.

Toontastic
Recommended by: Matt
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: Reading – Story Elements, Fluency, Creativity
Cost: Free

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Description
Student can create a visual story, summarize a book and learn about the elements of a narrative. Teachers should first ask students to write a story board before using Toontastic. The app also asks students to provide narration for the story and practice fluency by recording their voice. When completed, students can celebrate their efforts by sharing their final product on the document camera or mirroring via Apple TV.

Math Drills
Recommended by: Colette
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: Math
Cost: $1.99

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Description
Students have own personal settings for practicing math facts. Kids like the review part because it gives a good visual for skip counting. Boys like the race car reinforcement such as the car noises and the M.P.H. report on how fast you completed your facts. Also, the pit stop lets you go back and redo a problem you missed.

The Social Express
Recommended by: Jill
Grade Level(s): K-5
Content Area: School Counseling – Personal/Social and Health
Cost: $89.99

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Description
I recommend this app for any student who struggles socially to work with others, to make good decisions, and to express feelings appropriately. It would be especially beneficial for students with emotional/behavioral disorders, autism, and Aspergers.