What I’m Reading: March 2019

Black and Blue Magic by Zilpha Keatley Snyder (children’s literature)

I read this aloud to my son. It was hard for him (us) to put it down. Think of it as an original superhero story only told with all of the challenges and small details that come with a changed identity. This book would definitely work as a read aloud for upper elementary and invite students to explore more books by Snyder.

Hey, Kiddo by Jarrett J. Krosoczka (young adult graphic novel)

A graphic memoir (?) that is in the same vein as Sunny Side Up and Ghosts but for older readers. The story is memorable and well suited for the visual nature of the text. Definitely a book to have in the secondary classroom library to build diversity and cultural relevance.

Liminal Thinking by Dave Gray (nonfiction)

A succinct and readable summary of how beliefs drive our actions and how people can change them. There is a lot more to this topic than what is covered here, yet the accessibility of Gray’s text is well-suited for anyone to take the ideas and apply them immediately.

Love and Carmela Full of Wishes by Matt de la Peña (picture books)

I had the opportunity to listen to the author read aloud some of his books at a reading convention. He stopped at several points during the reading to explain a sentence or illustration and how it brought meaning to the text. Both books are excellent are for conveying the human experience from a unique perspective.

How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence by Michael Pollan (nonfiction)

This is an important book and maybe Pollan’s best yet. Through his both personal and historical investigation into psychedelics, the author removes much of the stigma from this hot button issue by revealing the potential it has for mental health.

On Life After Death by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross (nonfiction)

A staff member recommended this title to me not long ago. It is a provocative and hopeful book about what may happen when we die. The paradox of a scientist describing the afterlife, citing studies to add credibility to her position, made for interesting reading.

The Naming of the Dead by Ian Rankin (fiction)

My introduction to this series, which apparently continues to this day. My guess is Rebus, the detective and main character, is always close to retirement which must give him license to ignore authority at any possible opportunity. The dry humor and colorful characters makes this police procedural a good series to get acquainted with.

Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend (children’s literature)

Using the template that made Harry Potter a household name, Townsend offers a new story of unique characters trying to make sense of the world. The question “Who am I?” seems to be a central theme in this book. I look forward to reading the next one with my daughter.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl (memoir)

I think to fully appreciate this book is to understand the influence that it has had on so many other areas. For example, I am taking an instructional coaching course, and the teachers often reference Frankl’s memoir as an example of self-actualization. The past is clearly described in this short book. I believe it should be read so we can better understand our present and future.

Write Smart, Write Happy: How to Become a More Productive, Resilient and Successful Writer by Cheryl St. John (writing reference)

If you are struggling to get started with a writing project, or you need strategies to keep going with one, I recommend this resource. St. John’s voice is reassuring and confident, a successful author in her own right. Each chapter is brief and gives you concrete ideas for a successful writing life.

Reflecting on My Reading: Identity, Beliefs, and Change

I find it beneficial to list out some of your books you have been reading for the past three to six months or so and see if you can find any trends or patterns. (I am assuming reading is a habit for you.)

Looking at my list, one theme that seems to surface is personal change.

This certainly relates to school. As a principal, one of my primary roles is to facilitate growth with teachers. This interest has been sparked by the cognitive coaching course I am enrolled in this year. How does one influence change in another without projecting their own beliefs too much in the process? How does a person’s identity factor into one’s capacity for self-improvement?

“Real leadership challenges the leader before it challenges others.”

Eric Glover

Subsequently, I have started to examine my own beliefs and my capacity for change. You study something long enough and you start to see it everywhere, you know? Deep learning reveals new insights. Different points of view can serve as mirrors to my own identity and provide me with critical space to determine if I am satisfied with the current status.

This is what I enjoy most about reading: Being able to visit new places that are different than my own. Fiction or nonfiction, I put myself in someone else’s shoes while reading. The result is often a broader perspective of the world, with the hopeful benefit of becoming a little bit better as a person.

Leadership as Process

It is October, which means it is school learning objective time. Principals are diligently crafting statements that are S.M.A.R.T. “By the end of the school year,…” and then we make a prediction about the future. In April, we revisit these statements and see if our crystal balls were correct.

I must admit that my goals are usually not fully met. I aim too high, at least by educator evaluation standards. These systems are set up to shoot for just above the status quo instead of for the stars. Great for reporting out. Yet I don’t want to lower my expectations.

Setting objectives and goals are a good thing. We should have something tangible to strive for and know that we have a target to hit. My challenge with this annual exercise is how heavily we focus on a product while largely ignoring the process to get there.

Left alone, schools can purchase a resource or adopt a commercial curriculum that is aligned to the standards. But are they also aligned with our specific students’ needs? Do the practices and resources we implement engage our population of kids? Maybe we are marching toward a specific destination, but are we taking the best pathway to get there?

Having a plan and implementing a plan are two different things. Like an effective classroom teacher, we have to be responsive to the climate and the culture of a school. That means we should be aware of our environment, accept our current status, and then move forward together.

For example, when I arrived at my current elementary school, there was some interest in going schoolwide with the Lucy Calkins Units of Study for reading and for writing. Professionally, I find a lot of positive qualities about the program. Also in the periphery was a desire to get a more consistent literacy curriculum. Our scores reflected a need for instructional consistency and coherence.

If we have an outcome-focused leadership style, then it makes a lot of sense to purchase a program that promises exactly what is being requested. But that means we are investing in stuff instead of investing in teachers. So we declined. The teacher-leaders and I weren’t saying no to one program or passing the buck on making a hard decision. What we wanted instead was a clear plan to become better as practitioners.

This meant first revisiting our identities as educators. What does it mean as a teacher and a professional if the lessons were scripted for us? Are we not worthy of the trust and responsibility that is essential for the many decisions we make every day? This led to examining our beliefs about the foundation of literacy, the reading-writing connection. We found unanimity on only two specific areas out of 21 statements. Instead of treating this as a failure, we saw these two areas of agreement as a starting point for success. We nurtured this beginning and started growing ourselves to become the faculty we were meant to be for our students. After two years of work, we found nine areas of agreement on these same statements.

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There are no ratings or other evaluation scores attached to these statements. I am not sure how to quantify our growth as a faculty, and I am pretty sure I wouldn’t want to if I knew how. Instead, we changed how we saw ourselves and how we viewed our students as readers, writers, and thinkers. This is not an objective or goal that is suggested by our evaluation program, but maybe it should be.

I get to this point in a post and I feel like we are bragging. We are not. While I believe our teachers are special, there are great educators in every school. The difference, I think, is that we chose to focus more on the process of becoming better and less on the outcomes that were largely out of our hands. This reduced our anxiety with regard to test scores and public perception of our school. Anyone can do this work.