Priorities

Last week I sent an email out to our contributors, thanking them for their continued presence and participation on this site after this summer’s book study. Like last year, I inquired about their current interest in staying involved with the blog as well as shared ideas about how to improve the learning experience here for everyone.

One thing that impresses me about this group is how willing they are to contribute their time, energy, and ideas to this site. I am also impressed when they say, in so many words, “Sorry, can’t write or participate right now.” In either case, what they are communicating is their current priorities. Family, friends and outside interests (i.e. beyond the bubble of education) are necessary to stay balanced and to live an interesting life.

Thinking about priorities, I am reminded of a passage from author David Mitchell, in his essay “Neglect Everything Else”. It comes from the anthology Light the Dark: Writers on Creativity, Inspiration, and the Artistic Process, edited by Joe Fassler. (Thanks to Brenda Power, editor at Choice Literacy, for discovering and sharing this book.)

The world is very good at distracting us. Much of the ingenuity of our remarkable species goes toward finding new ways to distract ourselves from things that really matter. The Internet – it’s lethal, isn’t it? Maintaining focus is critical, I think, in the presence of endless distraction. You’ve only time to be a halfway decent parent, plus one other thing. (117)

I bolded the last sentence in my copy of this book. I also plan on writing it out in my planner before the school year begins as a constant reminder.

When I put out an inquiry to contribute here, or maybe to ask teachers in my school to complete a task or take that next step in our journey, I have to remember that we too can be a distraction. I’d like to think that what I ask for is of more value than some of the rabbit holes that can we fall into online. But still. When we request the attention of our colleagues, I want it to be worth everyone’s time which is invaluable and irreplaceable.

Why I Write

photo-1455390582262-044cdead277aRight now I am reading A Writer’s Guide to Persistence: How to Create a Lasting and Productive Writing Practice by Jordan Rosenfeld. It was given to me by Brenda Power, editor of Choice Literacy and Lead Literacy, of which I am a contributor. On page 14, Rosenfeld encourages the reader to journal about their top five reasons to write. Here is what I came up with:

1. To get my ideas down and out of my head.

I am almost always thinking about education. Unless I put these thoughts down on paper or on my computer, they tend to fester in my mind, never leaving me alone. Writing is a release for me. I can better go about my day once I have placed these ideas elsewhere. I can come back to them another time, especially if I decide to take that writing to the publishing stage.

2. To find out what lies beneath the surface.

I cannot remember where I read it, in a book about writing I am sure, but often when we start a piece we are merely “clearing our throat”. In other words, our initial attempts at prose are often stumbles and steps toward what we are really trying to say. Writing allows me to mine my thoughts and experiences and discover what is under all of the layers of our consciousness. Tom Romano, in his book Write What Matters: For Yourself, For Others, calls it writing “ourselves into insight” (34).

3. To share my questions and findings with others.

I think all educators have an obligation to share what we know and what are wondering. This can be done in a variety of ways. I prefer writing about it. What I share has a permanent place in the world, where others can come back to it, ask questions of their own, and share their experiences that might confirm or contradict what I believe. Everyone becomes smarter in the process.

4. To add value to my profession and my life

When I say “value”, I don’t necessarily mean money (although getting paid to write is a pretty sweet deal). By value, I mean the worth it provides to what I do as an educator. By writing, especially online, I become more of an expert in others’ eyes. I make connections with others pursing similar inquiries, which also adds value for both them and me. In addition, taking a piece of writing from start to finish is a pleasure that has few equals.

5. To bring different parts together to make a meaningful whole

It is impossible to make sense of every piece of information out there, especially in today’s connected world. The best we can do is to take a few different bits of knowledge, connect them together through the craft of writing, and then share our work with others. Writing is the best way I know to synthesize what I read, watch, and hear.

Why do you write? What are the reasons behind your work? Please share in the comments.