Summer Book Club 2018: Literacy Essentials by Regie Routman @StenhousePub #LitEssentials

Literacy EssentialsI am pleased and honored to share that we will be reading Literacy Essentials: Engagement, Excellence, and Equity for All Learners by Regie Routman (Stenhouse, 2018) for our summer book club. I’ve already read it and can attest to its excellence as a literacy resource for all educators. From May through July, contributors will post their thinking and takeaways on this collaborative blog while reading the book.

This is the 2nd professional resource we have explored together; last summer we read and responded to Becoming a Literacy Leader: Supporting Learning and Change, 2nd edition by Jennifer Allen (Stenhouse, 2016). To read some of the posts related to Jen’s excellent resource, enter “Becoming a Literacy Leader” in the search bar of this blog.

So who is this “we”? Last year, I opened up Reading by Example to other thought leaders in the field of literacy and leadership. Their posts made this site such a stronger resource. Featured writers for last year’s book study can be found on the “Contributors” page. The following educators are able & excited to participate in this year’s study group:

  • Paige Bergin, Instructional Coach
  • Carrie Krieder, Middle School Reading Specialist
  • Jen McDonough, Literacy Specialist
  • Heather McKay, Literacy Specialist
  • Annie Palmer, Literacy Coach
  • Lee Shupe, Middle School Math Teacher

The rest of this post attempts to answer questions related to the book study.

How will I know when a contributor publishes a response to Literacy Essentials?

There are a couple of ways to follow along with this book club. You can sign up with your email to receive a message every time someone posts a response here. If you have a free WordPress account, you can follow this blog, which means that any new posts will show up in your WordPress Reader. In addition, all posts will be shared out on Twitter with the hashtag #LitEssentials and include the @StenhousePub handle. (FYI – Regie is active on Twitter too!) If you prefer Facebook, new posts will be published on this blog’s page.

How can I participate?

One of the best parts of blogging is the participatory nature of the medium. Readers can leave a comment on a post and potentially initiate a discussion with the writer. They can also share out a post on social media for colleagues and followers to read and join in on the conversation. The possibilities for learning online increases the likelihood of unexpected and impactful experiences.

If you think you would like to be a contributor to this site, possibly now and in the future, please submit your request using the form on the Contributors page.

How can I get a copy of Literacy Essentials?

Stenhouse Publishers offers copies of Regie’s book to purchase. You can get a print copy, the eBook version or both. Go to their website: https://www.stenhouse.com/literacyessentials

Didn’t get your questions answered here? Anything else worth mentioning regarding this book club? Please post in the comments!

How to Start an Online Book Club on Goodreads

I write this title to draw in readers with the assumption that I know what I am talking about. Yes, I do know how to start a book club. But to get it going and sustain it for the long run? That will be the topic for another post.

Here are the steps I have taken to get things started on facilitating a book study for a group titled School Leaders as Readers:

1. Get a Goodreads account.

Goodreads is one of my favorite social media tools. It combines my love of reading with the online networking that creates unique connections with other readers. I wish we had something like Goodreads for kids. You can create an account through your Facebook profile, which is what I did. Otherwise just create an account through your email.

2.  Start adding books and bookshelves.

You can categorize books in three ways: “To-Read”, “Currently Reading”, or “Read”. I have several books jockeying for attention in the first two categories. As for the books I have completed, I recommend creating personalized bookshelves. This is a helpful way to curate what you have read for others to reference, or simply for you to reflect on later.

3.  Create a Goodreads group.

While it may seem odd to complete the first two steps before this one, I think it is pretty important. To start a book club online, I believe you need to be seen as an avid reader. It’s not enough to read a lot but are not actively sharing our reading lives. We expect this of our students; why not us?

Starting a group is pretty straight-forward: Select “Groups”, then “Create a Group” on the upper right side of your screen. At this point, Goodreads guides you through the next steps of giving your group a title, adding a book you want to read with your friends on Goodreads (friends will find you or be suggested to you, no worries), invite friends to your group, and then create discussion boards related to the major parts or chapters of the book you are reading.

You will want to keep your book club group’s title and purpose pretty generic, as you will hopefully be reading several books around topics of interest within this online community. Since you are the leader of the group, it is imperative that you start the discussion ball rolling with your own initial posts. Below are the first three I shared for our group’s first book, Mindfulness by Ellen Langer.

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As you can see from my initial post, I really need to read this book.

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I ended up gifting a copy to the librarian, and buying a gift card for the Good Samaritan.

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One thing I have appreciated about this online community is the sense of a “closed space”. I can write what I want to write, and not worry a whole lot about grammar, audience, purpose, etc. Of course, I am attending to those elements of good writing, but I am not worrying about it as much I might with a blog post (like this one) or more formal writing. No responses yet, but we only have six people in our group. If you are a school leader, consultant, or public education advocate in general, I hope you will join us for this initial experience. Click here to access our Goodreads community.

Bonus: Leave a comment on this blog post, and you are registered to win a free copy of Mindfulness by Ellen Langer!

Three Steps for Becoming More Engaged in Google+ Communities

These three screencasts were created for members of our Google+ Community around digital portfolios. I am hosting a book club on the topic in the next couple of days. After making the three tutorials, I realized they might also be applicable to anyone looking to become more active in their respective online groups on Google+.

Enjoy!

Do you want to develop digital portfolios with your students? Join our book club!

The single most important thing you could do tomorrow for little to no money is have every student establish a digital portfolio where they collect their best work as evidence of their skills.

-Dr. Tony Wagner, Expert in Residence, Harvard University

Developing digital portfolios with your students can be a game-changing action in your classroom. Here are just a few of the benefits:

Not sure where to begin? Then join our July Book Club!

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Here is how to get started:

  1. Purchase the book on Amazon (link), iBooks (link), or Nook (link). I am offering 10% off this month when purchased directly through me, if you don’t mind the brief lag in response and a PayPal request.
  2. Request access to our Google+ Community (link). This is where our conversations will be housed.
  3. Check out the dates below for a timeline of chapters to be read.

June 29 – July 3:   Chapter 1 – Purposes for Portfolios

July 6 – July 10:    Chapter 2 – Performance Portfolios

July 13- July 17:   Chapter 3 – Progress Portfolios

July 20 – July 24:  Chapter 4 – From Files to Footprints: Beyond Digital Student Portfolios

In August, we will keep the conversations going informally. It would be a good month to ask final questions and conclude our time together with a celebration of sorts.

What you can expect from me:

  • A thought-provoking question posted once a week day in our Google+ Community throughout the four weeks. Also expect possible follow up responses from distinguished members of our community and/or me.
  • Full access during these four weeks to me for questions and demonstrations you might request regarding digital tools, processes, and leadership strategies. I will include my personal phone number and offer Google+ Hangouts to chat in real time.
  • An update on what our school is implementing regarding digital portfolios, current tools of choice, and our school’s brand new process for helping students reflect on and respond to their important and lifeworthy work online.

Not bad, right? I am also willing to issue very formal (~ahem~) certificates of participation for this book club, assuming frequent and thoughtful activity in our Google+ Community. This documentation may be used toward professional hours/accreditation within your district or university. Please check with your supervisor before assuming anything.

In closing, I can confidently state that the teachers I’ve observed who have experienced the greatest growth in their students’ knowledge, skills, and dispositions are those that a) highlighted their students’ best work, b) provided time for them to reflect on their progress, and c) gave feedback on their current capacities and allowed for personal goal setting.

If these descriptors sounds like the teacher that you might want to be in 2015-2016, I highly encourage you to join us for our July 2015 book club. You won’t regret it.

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The Courage to Lead

81rS7W0DJ1LA group of 21 educators in my district just started a book study for The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life by Parker J. Palmer (Jossey-Bass, 2007). This book club consists of teachers, administrators, and professional support staff.

We are facilitating this book study in a Google+ Community. My hope is that this online forum will provide a safe space for everyone to reflect on our chosen profession and renew our purpose.

My role is to pose questions in the community and recognize others’ responses with “+1’s” and comments that acknowledge their thinking. I am also charged with setting dates in which we should have read a certain number of pages. If you have read The Courage to Teach, then you know this is not a text you can speed read through in a couple of days.

As I reread the introduction to start posting questions, I was struck by this powerful statement on page 4:

In our rush to reform education, we have forgotten a simple truth: reform will never be achieved by renewing appropriations, restructuring schools, rewriting curricula, and revising texts if we continue to demean and dishearten the human resource called the teacher on whom so much depends.

I am going to share this quote with our group. I thought it would be appropriate to share here as well.

For more on Parker Palmer’s thinking, check out his most recent post for On Being as we embark on a new year:

Five Questions for Crossing the Threshold

Questions Readers Ask Other Readers

In my school, reading intervention for 4th and 5th graders very much resembles a book club. There are a) lots of books that the readers are interested in, b) not a lot of tests or assignments, and c) lots of time to read. In fact, we call it “Howe Book Club”. The word “intervention” is not in the students’ lexicon. It takes place both during the school day in the afternoon and after school twice a week. It was designed this year based on a post from the Stenhouse blog.

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Now in full swing, we are tweaking things here and there to keep the kids reading. Example: Students were becoming less engaged in the paperbacks we had purchased for them. In response, we allocated some funds to purchased eReaders and allowed the students to choose the digital books to be downloaded on the devices.

Another area identified for growth is to encourage better conversations between the students about what they are reading. In her book The Reading Zone (2007), Nancie Atwell provides some excellent openers kids can respond to as well as questions they can ask each other. On page 83 in Chapter 7 (One-to-One), she suggests some of the following prompts:

I liked the way the author…

This book remind me of…

I’d say a theme of this book is…

I couldn’t understand…

Why did…?

She also shares many questions she asks her students as she “roams among readers” (92). I think many of these would be just as applicable when students talk to their peers about what they are reading:

What page are you on?

What do you think so far?

How is it so far, compared to his or her other books?

What genre is this one?

Why did you decide to read this one?

Where did you find this book?

Is this one worthy of a book talk?

What are you planning to read next?

The plan is to put some of these questions and prompts on a handy reference card and on a poster in our library where the intervention takes place. This skill will first need to be modeled by the interventionists, which consist of current and retired teachers. They could do this at the beginning of each session, where time is set aside for the adult to read aloud a favorite book to the group.

Once the students get the hang of speaking like readers, they can facilitate conversations both in person and online. There is time built in for each student to share something that resonated with them from what they are reading in their small group. We will also have them set up in a class on Edmodo. This will allow students to continue their conversations beyond the official intervention time.

These activities we are facilitating for our students are authentic and engaging. They are doing what real readers do – read books, write and share about what they read, listen to others talk about their experiences, and then find more books to read.

Engagement as a Reading Intervention

What would happen if, rather than focusing on teaching reading strategies, we focused instead on getting students engaged?

Peter Johnston provides this lead to one of the best blog posts I have read. Titled Reducing Instruction, Increasing Engagement, he describes a group of 8th graders who were given edgy fiction to read and discuss with peers during school. It seemed more like a book club instead of 7th Hour English. At the end of the year, assessments revealed that these students, with only one to three copies of each text, scored very well on achievement tests. At least as important, student behaviors decreased, trust among peers increased, and they reported being more happy.

Shortly after discovering this post on Stenhouse’s blog, I found out that my school could not host our computer-based after school reading intervention program for 4th and 5th grade students this year. Instead of canceling it all together, we are attempting to simulate the same set up that Peter describes. We are going to purchase limited copies of age-appropriate, high interest books. The only expectation we have for students is they show up, they read, and they share what they are reading with their peers in a way they prefer most. No tests. No book reports. Just lots of reading and enjoyment.

The adults must also think this looks like fun, as several staff members have already signed up to facilitate this reading intervention/book club. My reading resource teacher and ELL aide are waiting patiently for their purchase order to arrive so they can go to our favorite book store, Book Look in Plover, WI, to pick out the reading materials.

My question to you is, what books would you recommend for 4th and 5th grade reluctant readers?

Please share your suggestions in the comments. My interventionists look forward to your recommendations!