Data – not just another 4 letter word

I have to admit, I haven’t always been so keen on data. In my earlier years of teaching, “data” was just another 4-letter word, simply results of standardized tests. Our students are more than a test score, right? Now that I’ve been through a few districts, a couple graduate programs, and a number of administrators, I can say that my view of data has changed. What I came to realize is that I was using data all along; the data just weren’t the test scores that I came to associate with the word.

Now that I’m in the position of being able to guide teachers to looking closely at data, I don’t want to think of it as just another 4-letter word. Data is actually pretty awesome! I could get lost in miscue analyses – where is the student missing words? What is going on with them that their comprehension varies so much between fiction and non-fiction? What is their background? Could they be more successful with a different text? What strategies would work best with their strengths?

So being smart about data is not only about knowing *what* to focus on, but also keeping in mind that behind the data is a living, breathing human.

New Responsibilities

I am pretty excited about how my job will look this year. Four days a week I will be focusing on small group instruction with students receiving Tier 3 intervention. On our half-days (Friday afternoons are reserved for PD) I will have time to do progress monitoring and meet with teachers about students, do some coaching/strategy sharing, and take a close look at data to plan instruction. Jennifer shared a story at the end of this chapter that I anticipate will stay with me throughout my career. Reading about her listening to a colleague after being asked to advise on LLI procedures was very powerful. I believe that this kind of data collection is so important! Jennifer affirmed, for me, the value in listening to colleagues and observing behaviors to drive instruction.

I appreciate my school’s commitment to professional development and the recognition of the importance of data analyzation to drive instruction. The time that I’ll have will allow me to keep in mind that the student is the most important part of the equation, and be able to plan instruction based on what they need most.

I call that smart!

Designing Intentional Spaces

I’m a new reading specialist coming from a background in music education. I taught K-8 music for nine years before I chose to make the transition to literacy. I jumped on the chance to read Becoming a Literacy Leader, to learn from Jennifer Allen’s journey. The program I went through was fantastic, but there’s nothing like experience and learning from others’ experiences to really teach the nitty gritty stuff.

My current position was vacant for just shy of a year before I started. Students weren’t receiving reading intervention services, and classroom teachers weren’t getting literacy support. If I look at the silver lining of the situation, I have a lot of autonomy in what I do. Since nobody was in the position, it wasn’t all that established what it should look like. I kind of get to write my own job description! That said, I am looking forward to utilizing my classroom space and the time in my schedule in a smart way to support students and teachers.

One of my favorite parts of being a teacher is getting my space ready for the new school year. New storage! Coordinated supplies! How many times have I succumbed to the dollar bins at Target and came home with 5 or 6 cute little buckets, or a seasonally-themed storage container having no idea what would become of it once I got it into my classroom?

So, despite having studied interior design for two years, reflecting on Chapter 2 was kind of like a lightbulb moment for me. Of course, I should think about the room’s purpose first. Isn’t that what all my beloved design books and websites tell me, too?

I love the reading room as a resource for classroom teachers – somewhere they can come to get ideas or to chat about literacy stuff while also being an inviting space for students to receive intervention services. One of my core beliefs in education is that for anyone to learn, there has to be a sense of comfort and trust. The physical space reflects that – do children and adults feel comfortable coming into the room? It is inviting and warm? I think of how I feel when I walk into an unfamiliar place – if the space is inviting, I can relax and better take in what I need to, whether it’s in a doctor’s office or a gym. My room is small, but I think with some ingenuity and strategic planning, I’ll be able to make it work.

What are the best parts of your classroom? What designs have worked well for you? I look forward to getting some great ideas!

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