The Art of the Blog

I was searching my own blog, something I wrote that I could simply repost here which would convey strategies and ideas for blogging as an educator. This repost would have served as a quick guide of sorts for contributors for our upcoming book study that starts May 14. Here is what I have found so far:

The Writing Principal: Tips for Administrators Considering Blogging (October 2012)

If I post my blog and no one reads it, did I really write it? (April 2013)

Why Should Educators Blog? (July 2014)

Blogging is Writing and So Much More (July 2016)

These posts are just the ones I could find. This blog is over six years old, with almost 500 posts to search within. None of them fit the bill, hence the post you are about to read.

As I read through each piece listed above, I could see how I have grown as a writer. My writing has not followed some type of straight trajectory in terms of improvement. Rather, it has been a gradual process, with some successes and many more failures. For example, coming across as an expert has been a challenge that I have become more aware of in my writing.

But it is with the failures that I have learned the most. Specifically, through constant blogging about my practice as a literacy leader, I have come closer to understanding not only my profession but also the general principles of a blog post that is well received and remembered. I thought I would share a few ideas here, not as an expert but instead as a constant learner.

  • Be passionate about your topic.

I address this first principle for a wide audience. Whatever we decide to blog about, it has to be something that we care deeply about and want to create more visibility around. For me, I did not see a lot of content out there around literacy leadership. That lead me to start chronicling my new experiences in leading a reading-writing initiative in an elementary school. My passion came from the realizations of learning with my faculty and seeing these understandings applied within the classrooms of our school.

Blogging tip: When starting a blog, give it a title that encompasses what subject(s) you are writing about. It can be direct (see Mark Levine’s blog Mindful Literacy) or more general (check out Vicki Vinton’s blog To Make a Prairie). If direction changes, you can always change the title later.

  • Write from a place of curiosity.

When I first started this blog, I was a new elementary principal with limited knowledge about excellent literacy instruction. My ignorance as a classroom teacher was quickly revealed to me through our collective study of the reading-writing connection via the Regie Routman in Residence online professional development program. Through this experience, I was able to dig into my own learning from the perspective of a principal trying to lead this type of initiative through modeling, support, and consistent feedback.

Blogging Tip: Post titles that pose a question often see more views.

  • Allow yourself to be vulnerable.

Being vulnerable makes you relatable as a writer for your audience. They likely recognize your own struggles within themselves. This is especially important for literacy leaders such as school principals and instructional coaches. We often don’t have readily available colleagues to bounce ideas off of or share concerns with at the moment. A blog, written from a place of humility, can be the inspiration needed for other literacy leaders who share similar struggles and are searching for better ways to be effective.

Blogging Tip: If you are unsure about how a post might be received online, ask someone to review it first. You can assign a reviewer within WordPress.

  • Worry less about visuals.

I used to get caught up in finding that perfect picture to embed with my text. While a visual can catch the eye of a reader via Pinterest and Facebook, we have to remember that readers come for the writing. One impact of blogging is the staying power of the post. It exists on the Internet for time unseen. I have pieces on this site written years ago that still garner many views. Many of the most memorable blog posts I have curated from other writers have zero visuals. That said, I highly recommend Unsplash for images that are copyright free. Consider citing the photographer as a thank you. Also, Canva is a fun graphic design tool for promoting events, such as our book club starting next week.

Book Study.png

Blogging tip: When writing online, use lots of white space and try to keep paragraphs limited to eight lines or less (which I fail at constantly – see this post).

  • Make writing a habit.

Imagine climbing a mountain. With the many dips and rises, a writer is gradually heading upwards and onward. Persistence is critical. Jordan Rosenfeld, author of A Writer’s Guide to Persistence: How to Create a Lasting and Productive Writing Practice (Writers Digest Books, 2015), expands on this concept. “Persistence is the key factor, the dividing line, between writers who succeed and writers who merely wish to. It comes not from mental acuity or superstrength but from finding the deep meaning and joy at the root of your writing practice and calling on this joy to get you through the challenges. (1)” I am rereading Jordan’s guide and highly recommend it for all writers.

Blogging tip: Post at the minimum once a month, and preferably at least once a week.

What suggestions do you have for future and current bloggers? Please share in the comments.

 

Author: Matt Renwick

Matt Renwick is an 18-year public educator who began as a 5th and 6th-grade teacher in Rudolph, WI. He now serves as an elementary principal for the Mineral Point Unified School District (http://mineralpointschools.org/). Matt also teaches online graduate courses in curriculum design and instructional leadership for the University of Wisconsin-Superior. He tweets @ReadByExample and writes for ASCD (www.ascd.org) and Lead Literacy (www.leadliteracy.com).

6 thoughts on “The Art of the Blog”

    1. Heather, an easy way to reach a wider audience is to leverage social media. Share your posts out on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, etc. Also include relevant hashtags to the social media post, i.e. #litessentials for this book study.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Hi Matt,

    This looks great! Terrific blog with great ideas! Of course, I’m thrilled you feature the online book study as well.

    Just back last night from short getaway in Vancouver and am catching up on emails and tweets.

    Wishing you a good weekend, Regie

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Persistence is key – you are so right about this. It is often an area where I fall short. During the periods of my life when I have been consistent, I saw growth and along with that came a lot of motivation. It’s no different than our kids–to get them to write better, they have to write voraciously, and same for us! Thanks for the tips, Matt!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I think all of your suggestions are great! Especially your tip about having others review a post if you aren’t sure how it will be received. Sometimes I write to vent about things that bother me in education. I’ve been told that those type of posts (although cathartic) can be perceived in a negative way. So, if I have a rant-ish post I try to balance it out by including a positive spin.

    Liked by 1 person

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