4th Grade Classroom Talk: Using Notebooks as a Writer

IMG_2616Today, I had the opportunity to share my writing process with 4th graders. Their teacher invited me to speak for a half hour on how I use notebooks. The students were just getting started in this practice as they delved into their next workshop cycle.

I started by asking them how they might use their notebooks. “Jot writing ideas down.” “Keep track of information.” “Write out a first draft of a small moment.” Every student had a unique response. This was a nice segue to the point I wanted to make for my visit: a writer’s notebook is what the writer wants it to be. The teacher can and should provide strategies and structures for how to use them. But the writer has to own them. The more a notebook belongs to the writer, the more they are willing to take risks in their work which leads to better writing.

Below are my notes that I spoke to with the class, which were also in handout form for the students’ writing folders. Click Using Notebooks as a Writer for a printable copy of what I shared. Also, please share your notebook ideas as a writer in the comments – I’ll be sure to share them with the 4th graders!

Using Notebooks as a Writer

Ideas from Mr. Renwick

  • About the writing process
    • Revision is about making changes to the writing and about subtraction. My writing gets smaller, clearer, and better when I reread my writing and revise.
    • When I write in a certain genre, I read a lot of books and articles within that genre. It helps me get a sense of the way authors write for that type of audience and purpose.
      • I still read fiction! I have one nonfiction, one fiction going at any one time.
    • I write what I am curious about and interested in. Through my writing and research I learn a lot about the topic. If the project is not interesting and meaningful, I get bored.
  • About using notebooks as a writer
    • Capture ideas with a pocket notebook.
    • Mess around, doodle and try out new writing ideas in any notebook. Bad ideas are how I get to the good ideas.
    • Research and interviews are documented in my notebooks to be a better listener.
    • Collect quotes in the notebooks for later drafts; collect quotes on the cover for epitaphs (quotes that might begin a chapter).
    • Organize bigger projects by chapters and sections, but may not use every page.
    • Outline sections I want to write to help me get the big picture of what I want to say.
      • Reverse outline to clean up a messy draft.
    • Write out first drafts if I am feeling the flow (which I rarely do).
    • Manage deadlines in my notebooks – I have editors to help keep me accountable.
      • Who keeps you accountable with your writing?
    • Manage related projects to the writing – workshops, courses, articles to publicize.
    • Personal tasks go in notebooks too, such as grocery lists, thank you’s, gifts.

Author: Matt Renwick

Matt Renwick is an 18-year public educator who began as a 5th and 6th-grade teacher in Rudolph, WI. He now serves as an elementary principal for the Mineral Point Unified School District (http://mineralpointschools.org/). Matt also teaches online graduate courses in curriculum design and instructional leadership for the University of Wisconsin-Superior. He tweets @ReadByExample and writes for ASCD (www.ascd.org) and Lead Literacy (www.leadliteracy.com).

4 thoughts on “4th Grade Classroom Talk: Using Notebooks as a Writer”

  1. So many articles talk about the use of technology and Reading by Example has many interesting articles to read about this. Matt in this article you are referring to the use of a paper notebook and a pen?

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  2. Hello, Mineral Point 4th graders! When I am done writing for the day, I take a few minutes to write down where I am going for the next time I will write. For example, last night, I stopped writing at the end of a chapter, so in my notebook, I reminded myself where I would pick back up today. This helps me move forward more quickly so that I do not sit down to write without any ideas or direction.

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