Writers Must Read – Wisconsin Writes

This post is to highlight a video series from Marci Glaus for the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. The series is titled “Wisconsin Writes“. From the DPI website:

Wisconsin Writes provides a glimpse into example writing processes of Wisconsin writers from a variety of contexts. Each video story featured captures the recursive, complex, often messy process that we call writing from some of the best writers in the state.

In this video, titled “Writers Must Read”, local writers share why it is so important to be a reader if one wants to write well. I thought the video had a great message and unique insights for students and teachers.


I’m currently looking for writers myself: literacy leaders from a variety of positions willing to share their stories and expertise on this blog. If interested or would like more information about participating in this collaborative experience, fill out the form below.

Author: Matt Renwick

Matt Renwick is a 17-year public educator who began as a 5th and 6th grade teacher. After seven years of teaching, he served as a dean of students, assistant principal and athletic director before becoming an elementary principal in Wisconsin Rapids. Matt is now an elementary principal for the Mineral Point Unified School District (http://mineralpointschools.org/). Matt tweets @ReadByExample and writes for ASCD (www.ascd.org) and Lead Literacy (www.leadliteracy.com).

2 thoughts on “Writers Must Read – Wisconsin Writes”

  1. Thank you so much for posting this, Matt! As a teacher of readers and writers, we talk constantly about how the two go hand in hand. We’ll show this to 8th graders today, and while many will roll their eyes, those who “get it” can take some validation that Wisconsin writers are telling them something they all ready knew! Enjoy your day! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The eye rolls are worth it, Darin. 🙂 Hearing from authors about the importance of reading is a great message. Thanks for taking the time to communicate this great resource from our DPI with your students.

      Like

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